In Chicago Tribune, Gray offers advice on caring for fussy newborn

[img_caption src=”https://www.erikson.edu/wp-content/uploads/Gray-Larry-175×150.jpg” link=”https://www.erikson.edu/about/directory/lawrence-gray/” align=”right” caption=”Larry Gray” alt=”Photo: Larry Gray”]Larry Gray, M.D., medical director for Erikson’s Fussy Baby Network, talked with the Chicago Tribune about how to care for a fussy infant.

Gray notes that babies enter the world with an affinity for warm, tightly contained environments that replicate the mother’s womb. Because they can’t yet control their arms and legs, being held offers babies the organization they crave but can’t provide.

Research across cultures has found the most successful outcomes when babies are held close to their parents during their first days, then given space to learn self-regulation skills as time goes on.

“If anything, it’s better for them,” Gray says. “The more you have held them in the early days, the better for the baby. But then, as the baby grows and develops, that caregiving has to change.”

CHICAGO TRIBUNE: Newborn wants to be held around the clock